Trips to New York are usually such a blur; we only spent 24 hours there, 2 of which were devoted to the MoMA. While I would have loved to sit and take in each piece for more than a minute or two, time just didn’t allow for that, so I’m glad that I brought my DSLR. Being able to go back and focus in on the details you may have missed is a godsend.

(Each picture can be clicked for higher resolution)

Take this Picasso sculpture called Bull, when you’re whirling through the gallery, you tend to miss details like the pieces of reclaimed wood or the sticks that look like they were found while on a forest walk.

The famous The Persistence of Memory by Dali was actually much smaller than I thought. The quality didn’t end up being very high because of its size and also the glass in front of it caught my reflection.

Pollock’s Full Fathom Five is just so much to take in. Even just looking at a picture of it can be overwhelming.

In this Mondrian, entitled Composition in Red, Blue and Yellow, you can see details like his initials and the date in red on the black vertical lines. But you can also see cracks in the yellow paint, the brush strokes in white, and even the tiny imperfections in the black lines.

Everyone knows Van Gogh’s The Starry Night, but what isn’t apparent when you’re standing 3 feet away amongst a huge crowd is how each stroke is individually loaded with different colors of paint, creating ridges and textures.

And finally Monet’s Water Lilies, I could have spent all day in this room, but having a high quality photo isn’t a terrible alternative. The white balance was off though, so my adjustments are more of a memory than a reproduction.

 

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